Weekend Project — Timed Outlet

I have a cordless drill with rechargeable batteries.  The batteries charge completely in about 20 minutes.  They are not supposed to stay on the charger for longer than that.  However, unless I am standing right there after the charging time, I forget to take the batteries off of the charger.

To fix this problem, I made a timed duplex power outlet out of a countdown timer and a duplex outlet.  I plug the timed outlet into a 120v outlet.  Then, plug the battery charger into the duplex outlet attached to the timer.  Finally, I set the timer to 20 minutes and walk away.  (There are more details about the parts and assembly on the Instructable.)

One problem I had is that the faceplate that came with the timer was too wide.  It covered the timer and a bit of the duplex outlet.  I found a Thing on Thingiverse that uses the Customizer to custom build faceplates that cover from one to five outlets with any configuration.  I used it to make a custom faceplate for two outlets with a single hole for the timer on the left-hand side and holes for a duplex outlet on the right-hand side.  I printed it on the Makerbot 3D printer using black PLA filament.  I used 100% infill to make it solid and durable.

 One problem I had with the print was that the raft stuck to the surface in some spots and would not come off.  So, there are a few rough looking spots.  Another problem is that the hole for the timer knob was a bit too small.  I had to drill it out slightly bigger.

 After attaching the new faceplate, I used my label maker to print the numbers for the dial.

That’s it.  No more ruined batteries due to overcharging.  And, it’s portable!

timerOutlet

 

Home Environmental Sensor Array (Phase 1) Finished

After six months of working on this on-and-off, I installed my home environmental sensor array (HESA) in my basement. Basically, it looks for water in the basement. If it detects water, it shuts off power to my water softener (assuming that the softener is or will, dump more water into the basement), and sends me an email.  The HESA has a Raspberry Pi to detect water and control the PowerSwitch Tail relay.  It also connects to the internet via my home network.

HESA

This is phase one of my HESA project. The device I built in this phase will only detect water. Future phases will add the capability to detect more things and be more interactive.

This is basically, my first real Maker project.  I learned or practiced many Maker skills like soldering, basic electronics, and CNC routing. I made my own PCB (that I did not end up using). I did some basic metal work with a jig saw. I learned how to use several software tools for CAD and design. I learned to program in Python. And I had a lot of fun doing it.

Several Makers at the Milwaukee Makerspace helped me with this project. There is no way I could have built this without them. Thanks to anyone who took time to help me move this project forward.

Wiki project page

Blog

Argyle Pattern Cutting Board

My latest cutting board is a based on a design I saw online.  It’s built around an argyle pattern that is often found on sweaters.

The first step is to glue a 1.5″ x 1.5″ pieces of poplar and red oak together in a 2 x 2 grid pattern. Additionally, one(1) red oak and two(2) poplar pieces are glues in a “L” shape. Each assembly is about 10″ long. Then, each assembly is sliced into 3/4″ pieces on the table saw or the chop saw. We need eight(8) of the 2×2 pieces and ten “L” shaped ones. The picture below shows the final intended layout.

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In the next step, the hard maple borders are added. The following picture shows some of the earliest glue-ups.

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Then, the edges are trimmed and walnut is added to the outside. I chose to use a CNC router to flatten the cutting board surface.

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I soaked the  board in mineral oil for 24 hours and finished with some butcher block conditioner and voila!

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Aaaaaand… Cut!

Silhouette Cameo

Hey, we got something new! It’s a Silhouette Cameo, which I like to refer to as a “Desktop CNC Cutting Machine”, though you can call it a vinyl cutter if you like. (It can also cut paper and fabric.)

I personally own one of these, and get a lot of use out of it, and I got sick and tired of hauling it back and forth to the space, so after posting a message on our email list to see if anyone else wanted to chip in and get one, we got one. In fact, there was so much interest we also got a bunch of vinyl, and spare blades and cutting mats.

The Silhouette has a wiki page, and we’ve already used it in a class. Now you can make your own crazy signs and other vinyl-covered things.

Further Adventures in CT Scan 3D Ego Printing

 

 

After a long series of manipulations, the CT scan derived  face was successfully used to make a pencil holder (of all things!).  It is about 100mm high and took about 9 hours to print.  You can find files that you can use to make your own mash-ups of my face on thingiverse: http://www.thingiverse.com/thing:203856

3 face cup 2

Easy RTC Time Set

RTC Time set

I made a few RTC / LCD clocks and disliked setting the time using an Epoch converter so I found a solution that uses 2 buttons to advance the Hours and Minutes.  I substituted toggle switches for the buttons because I didn’t want to have to hold down the button while the Minutes were advancing, thus enabling me to move on to determining how long it is until Spring!.

RTC Timer

Successful CT scan processing into 3D printable file

Today was spent researching all the manipulations involved in getting a CT scan into printable form and I managed to get a print out of it.  The process starts with DeVide where the dicom data from the CT scan is processed using a dual threshold, decimation filter, and stl writer.  The stl file contains a lot of unwanted stuff, in this case, soft tissues inside my head that add triangles but won’t be seen in the print, so those are removed by applying ambient occlusion followed by selecting and deleting vertices by “quality” (which will be very low values for vertices on the interior of the object).  This process invariably blows small holes in the desired surface, so you apply a “close holes” filter to fix that (which closed up the nostrils very nicely).  Next you open the stl file in netfabb and rotate and clip unwanted external stuff and apply repairs as necessary.  Finally, drag it into slicer and scale it. slice and print.

First successful ego print!

First successful ego print!

CT Scan Processing into 3D printable STL files

CT Scan with lower threshold swept

CT Scan with lower threshold swept

While investigating software to extract bone data from CT scans and turn it into 3D printable STL files, I played with a CT scan of my own head that was used to treatment plan orthodontics.  I have been using DeVide to process the data and finding it is not only easy to use, but a lot of fun!

The animated gif was made by sweeping the lower threshold of a dual threshold module from -800 to 900 in steps of 100 with the upper threshold fixed at 1400.  The effect is to strip away the lower density tissues leaving only dense bone at the end of the sweep.  I saved the result of each run as a png file then converted to an animated gif using an on-line service.