First Ever Test of the 3.5 Liter Syringe Extruder

My last post showed how I made a plunger for a 3.5 liter syringe.  Today’s post is the results of the first ever test of that syringe assembly including the plunger.  The goal of the test was to determine if the syringe pusher would be able to push very thick, viscous paste (sort of like melted chocolate) out of the 1/4″ syringe nozzle.  It was also a test of the ability of the previously made silicone plunger to maintain a seal even against whatever pressure develops inside the syringe as it is pushing.

I mixed about 1 liter of extra thick pancake batter to a consistency that I thought would be much thicker than molten chocolate (pancake batter is much cheaper than chocolate) and shoveled it into the syringe, then bolted on the pusher and hooked it up to a power supply:

Looking back, I probably should have loaded the syringe from the other end.

Syringe loaded with super thick pancake batter.

Syringe loaded with super thick pancake batter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s the actual test.  It gets especially interesting about 1 minute in:

The syringe continued drooling after power was removed due to air that was trapped inside the syringe.  As the plunger pushed, the air was compressed.  When the motor stopped the compressed air continued to push out the batter.  I will have to be careful to eliminate air bubbles in the material when it comes time to use this in a printer.

It only took a couple minutes to clean out the syringe after the test was done.

The pusher did its job much better than expected, and the plunger held up just fine, too.  I feel confident that this device will be able to extrude chocolate.   Now the real work begins…

Making a Plunger for a Chocolate Syringe

My latest project is a 3D printer that will produce chocolate objects.  Like many other chocolate printers, it will include a syringe to dispense the chocolate.  Unlike those other printers, the syringe in my printer will have 3.5 liter capacity to enable printing large objects.

The syringe is made from PVC pipe using mostly standard fittings.  One piece that wasn’t standard was the plunger that fits inside the syringe tube and pushes on the chocolate contained therein.  I had to design and fabricate the plunger.  PVC pipe isn’t perfectly smooth or perfectly round inside, so I needed something compliant enough to ride out the pipe’s bumps and constrictions while maintaining a seal.  The seal needed to be tough, yet safe for use with food because it will be in contact with the chocolate inside the syringe.  I found some food-grade silicone casting material and ordered it.

While waiting for the silicone to arrive, I designed a 3D printable core for the plunger and a mold and jig.  The core fits on the end of a linear actuator that will provide the push.  The jig centered the core a few mm above the bottom of the mold.  The mold was tapered and the widest part -the bottom- was a few mm larger diameter than the pipe, and several mm larger diameter than the core.  The silicone envelops the core and is locked in place by holes that connect top and bottom side of the core.  The plunger squeeze-fits into the pipe to maintain the seal against the uneven inner surface of the pipe.

Mold, jig, and core for syringe plunger

Mold, jig, and core for syringe plunger

Mold, jig, and core for syringe showing core inserted into jig.

Mold, jig, and core for syringe showing core inserted into jig.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mold, jig, and core assembled for silicone over-molding.

Mold, jig, and core assembled for silicone over-molding.

I measured and mixed the silicone, coated the core with it and then set the core and jig in/on the mold and let it cure for 24 hours.  Then I removed the jig and broke the now silicone covered core out of the mold.  Result: a perfect, tight fit inside the syringe tube.

Core in mold with silicone.

Core in mold with silicone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finished plunger removed from the mold.

Finished plunger removed from the mold.  The mold had to be broken off by design.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plunger mounted on linear actuator.

Plunger mounted on linear actuator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The assembled syringe.

The assembled syringe.

Easter at the Makerspace

eggs

As we think about Easter, we can’t help but think about all the cool stuff we could do at the Makerspace. Oh sure, we’ve got the Egg-Bot, to plot art onto eggs (and other spherical objects) but hey, that’s almost too easy, right? What else can we do?

wood bunnies

Maybe some laser-cut bunnies! We could use the Laser Cutter to cut out some bunnies and do something interesting with them. (Or the CNC Router could be used for bigger pieces.) Hmmm, I bet we could even make some sort of crazy laser-cut Easter baskets, maybe using living hinges.

Speaking of bunnies, what is Easter without chocolate, put them together and you’ve got chocolate bunnies, which I’d consider the pinnacle of Easter treats.

bunny

With the Makerbot we could print these awesome chocolate bunny molds and kick out our own chocolate bunnies!

So… what will you be making for Easter?