Time Delay Relay

Time Delay Relay

I’m working on a project that requires two power strips to be turned on in a sequence. The first power strip powers 6 HDMI displays, and the second one powers 6 computers. The displays have to be on before the computers so they sync properly and get the correct resolution. Since I can’t rely on a person to do this properly, automation is the answer.

My first thought was to use something like a PowerSwitch Tail with a microcontroller to trigger it. (There’s also a cheaper kit version available.) The issue with this solution is that I’d need a microcontroller, and a power supply for the microcontroller, which are more parts, and more points of failure, and take up more space. I also considered using a cheap relay module, but ultimately I was overly complicating the whole thing. Also, I want this to be reliable, and sticking a 5v power supply, a microcontroller, and a relay in a box for three years seemed a little risky.

What I really needed was a “Time Delay Relay” which is a device that can get power, wait X number of seconds, and then power on another thing. There’s a whole bunch of them you can just buy! Time Delay Relays are not cheap though… This one is under $40, but you’ll probably also want the socket, which puts you closer to $50.

Luckily, Milwaukee Makerspace is filled with all sorts of old industrial “junk” and we have a bunch of these sitting on a shelf! Brant (you know, the guy who made a Auto-Off Timed Outlets from an old microwave control panel) helped me find one and get it wired up last week. It works great!

I used a $3 extension cord to provide an easy way to plug it into the first power strip and plug the second power strip into it. There’s a dial that lets you set the delay up to 10 seconds, which is more than enough for my needs.

Time Delay Relay

If I’ve learned anything from this project it’s that even though you think you might have a good solution to a problem, it’s still worth asking others (at the space or on the mailing list) because you may get a better solution, and may even get the parts you need.

Auto-Off Timed Outlets

If you’re like me, you’ve left a soldering iron plugged in once or twice.  Hopefully you’re also lucky like me and it’s never started a fire.   Occasionally I’ll grab something off our Hack Rack and take it apart.  A) It’s fun and B) it helps cut down on the ever-growing pile of appliances in the East Room.  Recently I focused my efforts on a microwave oven.  During my salvage operation I managed to extract one plastic fan, two thermal cutout switches, a transformer, the magnetron, a huge capacitor, and the controls.  I soon realized that what I had in front of me was a digital timer wired to a normally open relay.  I couldn’t immediately think of something to do with it, but it seemed too good to toss or disassemble further.  About a week later I decided to wire it to a pair of 120-volt receptacles.  Voila.  Any appliance with a standard plug can be set to run from 00:01 to 99:99 before powering off.  Just press “TIME COOK” then enter the time in minutes and seconds, then start.  The relay closes the circuit and the outlets are energized.  When the timer runs out, a piezo buzzes and the outlets shut off.  The relay on the microwave’s circuit board is 120-250 volt at 16 amps, so I’m fairly comfortable it will handle one or two 40-watt soldering irons.

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Refreshing the Singing Pumpkin Display

I’m getting my original singing pumpkin display ready for BVNA’s Pumpkin Pavilion and Halloween. The original display was pure prototype electronics consisting a bunch of stuff from Adafruit: an UNO, a Wave Shield, a PWM/Servo driver, and servos. There was a footprint challenged custom PCB for a TDA7297 and some junk bin DC-DC convertors.

OldController

It didn’t look pretty, but it did the job for years. However, the new fully integrated prototype controller looks a lot snazzier.

NewController

There are still more design changes to come for this board, but it was really nice to see it perform as intended in my full display.