Because wedding insanity is real

When my husband and I started planning our wedding earlier this year, we wanted to make sure we got to spend time with all of our family members who were traveling in from out of town, many from out of state.  It was one of our many reasons for trying to have a small guest list for our intimate wedding.

Oh, and also because the wedding industry is crazy.

When I saw that the veil I wanted to go with my dress was just as expensive as the dress, I decided it wasn’t that important to me.  I saw a lot of Pinterest boards with DIY wedding veil pictures and tutorials, so I figured I would give it a shot.  If it failed, no big deal.  So, this is the story of my $15 wedding veil.


I started with some tulle that was donated to the Makerspace’s Craft Lab, and sorta followed a tutorial online.  The biggest pain was pinning the tulle folded in half, so that when I cut the rounded corners, it was even.  With Karen’s help, I used ol’ string-on-a-peg to make a partial circle cut line, which let the veil fall nicely around my head.

Using invisible thread I sewed the trim lace (bought via Etsy) to the edge of the veil.  If I were doing this again, I’d clean up the lace before sewing it on, but I did it at the end and it turned out okay.


While working, I laid the veil on a very large piece of fleece material, and also folded it up inside the fleece to keep it from sticking together (the eyelashes on the lace liked to cling to the tulle).



Take THAT, wedding industry people!!

Luke, I am your fire pit…

Darth Head

Whether you think this looks like Darth Vader or Dark Helmet it’s still cool. Mark has been making fire pits and wood burning stoves out of used propane tanks for a while at the space. This is the first one I’ve seen him make that is meant to look like a character. As usual he’s doing a great job. Mark has also been giving some more one-on-one welding classes at the space. Don’t miss out if you want to learn how to weld from a master.2 imagesDarthThe welding is only the beginning.  It can be easy to forget about the less sexy part of making.  Grinding and painting.  Though the natural look of rust is cool Darth Vader was black.  I am looking forward to seeing more characters represented in Mark’s work.  If you see him around the space suggest one to him.vader 3 images

Power Wheels Racing

Race HeadLast month the Milwaukee Makerspace power wheels team packed up the cars and road tripped to2 images vertical Maker Faire Detroit.  After long nights working at the space until 4am for the week before the drive Ed, Kathy, Pete, Andy, Vishal, and too many others to mention got 3 cars race ready.  The Bluth Stair Car, Super Tux Kart, and Hippie Rose made the journey to Detroit without damage are and were a blast to drive.


Our 3 cars raced with 34 others in the biggest Power Racing Series event to date on the biggest track ever made.  It was great to see all the hard work paying off as the builders of the cars became the happy drivers of the cars. Both days of races were streamed live by our friends at Make Magazine to where they can still be watched. Be sure to check out the race at Maker Faire Milwaukee September 24th-25th.


Check out the race from day one at the link below:

Time To Get Nerdy!

Nerdy Head

Make sure not to miss this weekend’s Nerdy Derby at American Science and Surplus. Adrian and the rest of the nerdy team will be helping kids and kids at heart turn blocks of wood into rolling masterpieces of speed. If you have not been to a Nerdy Derby event this will be one not to miss.  3D printed wheels have been coming in from printers all over the city and from our Makerspace 80 at a time.

2 images nerdy

Building a car is easy and there will be a nice long track to race down once you’ve finished your creation.  You start by picking a block of wood and some wheels. After a bit of nailing its off to nerdy up your car from piles of amazing decorations. Makers are encouraged to decorate, test, and re-decorate. Everything that you glue onto a car affects the way it moves down the track. See you there!


August 20th 11am-3pm
American Science & Surplus Milwaukee
6901 W Oklahoma Ave
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53219

Replacing the Glass Print Bed on the Taz 3 Printer

The glass bed on the Makerspace’s Taz 3 printer recently did what glass does- it broke.  Time for a repair and upgrade!

I started by cutting the under carriage down and modifying it for a three point leveling system instead of the stock four point undercarriage/bed plate bending scheme.

Modified undercarriage mounted on the printer

Modified undercarriage mounted on the printer














The original heater was separated from the shards of glass and glued to the 12″ x 12″ x 1/4″ cast aluminum tooling plate using high temperature silicone.  3x #10 countersunk screws and springs support the plate on heat resistant teflon blocks.  The whole assembly stands about 1 cm taller than the original bed plate so I printed a small extension for the Z=0 set screw so it would trip the switch from the higher position.  I tested the heating time and found that the bed gets up to 110C in about 16 minutes- a little slow, but we probably won’t be printing much ABS with this open frame machine anyway.  Next- run PID autotune for the bed heater and adjust acceleration (greater moving mass means lower acceleration and print speeds).

New bed plate and undercarriage mounted on the printer

New bed plate and undercarriage mounted on the printer
















Some of you might ask why I would replace the glass bed with a piece of cast aluminum tooling plate.  Thermal performance is one good reason.  Here’s an IR photo of the original glass bed:




IR image of the Taz 3 printer with original glass bed.













Notice the hot and cool spots- 30C temperature variation across the bed.

Here’s what the new aluminum bed plate looks like:





Temperature variation is just a few degrees over the entire surface (the bright almost horizontal lines are not hot spots- they are reflections of the X axis guide rails).


I have run the PID tuning on the new bed and modified the firmware with the new constants.  It heats from 25C to 100C in about 9 minutes.

I officially declare the Taz printer ready for action.